Archive | April 2016

Engagement: Metrics

I wrote some weeks ago a summary of a conference about engagement (find the post here). This graph summarizes the most important reasons that keep your people engaged. Remember, managers cannot make people happy, but they have a big influence in creating the right environment. Enjoy!

engagement

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How to understand customers: The empathy map

Research shows that the biggest mistake a company can make is to use time and resources doing something nobody wants (Find a link to a summary report at http://100firsthits.com/ or here).

Startup-Mistakes-Infographics

This happens all the time. Everybody knows that innovation is all about the customer, but we tend to forget that we have to understand customer needs before we do anything else. Customers put us in a different point of view and empathy maps are tools which can help us see the world from our customer’s perspective. Validating ideas is the basis of user centered design (vs. solution centered design)

Empathy maps were created and first used by XPLAIN. Today there are several slightly different templates available, most of them with 6 different blocks like in this example:

Empathy-Map-No-Stickies

Empathy maps help you think and feel like one of your customers:

  • What do they think about the product? How do they feel about it (is it a good experience, is it painful?)
  • What do they see when using the product? Where are they? With who?
  • What do they hear others say about the product? Has anyone recommended it?
  • How do they use the product? What problems do they face? How do they solve them?
  • What are their wishes?
  • What are their pains?

Some questions are easier to answer (behaviors, problems, recommendations) because they can be seen or heard, others are difficult (pains, wishes, feelings). Do your best and put yourself in your customers’ shoes. Try hard!

This is the typical process to use the empathy map:

  1. Select a team: Developers, Managers, Stakeholders & Customers (if possible)
  2. Segment your customers. This is not mandatory but it will help you “feel like a customer” and avoid generic ideas, which are useless. Think the way a “traveler” feels at an airport; now think about “a pregnant woman at an airport” or a “person with limited mobility at an airport”. See the difference?
  3. Choose a customer segment and make them personal. Draw a picture of them, give them a name. Empathy is about feeling close to people: thinking about a “traveler” is one thing; thinking about “Peter and his two kids, Susan and Kevin, who are traveling to Miami to see their grandmother” is something different.
  4. Go question by question and fill the empathy map: “How do I feel?”, “What do I see?”, “What are the problems I face?”, “What could make me happy?” and so on. Write answer on post-its and stick them to a flip chart. Seriously, no computers.
  5. List ideas of innovative potential solutions.

The empathy map creates many assumptions and hypothesis that must be validated before moving on. Validating data with customers is critical and is trickier than it seems. Interviewing and asking the right questions can make a big difference.

  • Bad questions: Feeling-based questions like “Is this a good product?”, “Do you like it?”, “Is this something you would pay for?”
  • Good questions: Fact-based questions like “What are the main problems?”, “What do you miss?”, “What happened last time you used it?”, “Where do you use the product?”, “Has anybody recommended this to you?”, “How do you use this product?” an so on.

This video (from The Lean Playbook) shows the importance of validating data and asking great questions:

The empathy map is a great tool to help a development team understand customers. Don’t waste time and money building something nobody wants.

nobodyFind out more here: